CHURCH OF EL SAGRARIO

The church of the Tabernacle was attached to the Cathedral between 1618 and 1662, following the plans of the architects Miguel de Zumárraga, Alonso de Vandelvira and Cristóbal de Rojas. It is an imposing Baroque temple with a single nave with side chapels, on which stands are placed between buttresses. In them are a series of eight colossal stone sculptures of evangelists and doctors of the church, made by José de Arce. It has a wide transept that is not noticeable from the outside, covered by a large dome with a lantern. The rest of the nave is covered with vaults, so characteristic of the Baroque.

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On the outside, the façade is divided into three floors decorated with attached pilasters in the three classical orders: Doric on the first floor, Ionic on the second and Corinthian on the third. The decoration, apart from these pilasters, is practically non-existent, with the exception of the parapet that finishes off the entire building, on which a series of striking flamers are arranged. It has three main entrances, one from the Patio de los Naranjos, another from the Cathedral at the foot and another from Avenida de la Constitución, on the Evangelio side, which is generally used to access the church. The latter has a very simple classical portal, with two pairs of Tuscan columns supporting a pediment. In its center is the coat of arms of the Cathedral Chapter, with the Giralda between vases of lilies. On it, the allegories of Faith and Charity appear reclining.

Also very classical but more monumental is the doorway through which one enters from the cathedral. It was designed by Pedro Sánchez Falconete and in its central niche we see San Fernando, framed by Saints Justa and Rufina and the brother bishops San Isidoro and San Leandro.

Inside, the sculptural decoration of the vaults was carried out around 1655 by the brothers Miguel and Pedro de Borja, who also made the relief with the Allegory of Faith that is located above the entrance of the feet.

The main altarpiece comes from the Vizcaínos Chapel of the now-defunct Casa Grande de San Francisco Convent, which was located in the current Plaza Nueva. The structure was made by Dionisio de Ribas and the sculptures by Pedro Roldán, who got one of his masterpieces here. In the center, there is the scene of the Descent, with the body of Jesus already resting on his Mother's lap. On both sides, there are two beautiful young angels, full of dynamism, and in the attic a Veronica shows her cloth with the Holy Face, also accompanied by angels. The set is finished off with a representation of San Clemente, who is the official owner of the temple. This image of San Clemente comes from the original altarpiece that preceded the current one. Apparently it was a spectacular set made at the beginning of the 18th century. With the expansion of neoclassicist taste in the 19th century and a certain phobia of what was considered excessive ornamentation, it was decided to destroy it in 1824. The current altarpiece would be located in this location in 1840.

On both sides of the transept there are two large reddish marble altarpieces made in the mid-18th century. The one on the left side is presided over by a Christ on the Cross from the beginning of the 17th century, made by the sculptor of the Madrid school Manuel Pereira. La Dolorosa at its feet is the work of the brilliant 18th century sculptor Cayetano de Acosta, who also made the sculptures that decorate the altarpiece on the other side of the transept. In this case, we see in the central niche a beautiful Virgin with Child.

As for the side chapels, from the presbytery towards the feet and on the Gospel side, we find the following:

- Chapel of Cristo de la Corona, with a neoclassical altarpiece from the 18th century, presided over by a Nazarene dedicated to Cristo de la Corona. It is an emotional image from the 16th century that is the owner of his own Brotherhood, taking a procession on Friday of Sorrows through the surroundings of the parish.

- Chapel of San Millán, with an 18th century altarpiece, in which, in addition to San Millán, Santa Catalina, the Immaculate Conception, San Roque and Santa Gertrudis appear.

- Chapel of Saint Joseph. It has an altarpiece from the late 17th century, presided over by an image of San José by Pedro Roldán or his circle.

- Chapel of Saints Justa and Rufina, with an 18th century altarpiece presided over by an image of the Sacred Heart from 1948, flanked by images of the Saints, from the same period as the altarpiece.

Also from the presbytery to the feet, but on the Epistle side, we find:

- Chapel of the Virgen del Rosario, presided over by an image made by Manuel Pereira at the beginning of the 17th century, although re-polychromed in the 18th century.

- Chapel of San Antonio, with an altarpiece dated 1667 and made by Bernardo Simón de Pineda, one of the most outstanding altarpiece artists of the Sevillian Baroque. On the altar is an ivory Crucified from the 17th century from the Philippines.

- Chapel of the Immaculate. In it there is a beautiful image of the Immaculate Conception, anonymous from the beginning of the 18th century. The chapel is also the seat of the Sacramental Brotherhood and in it we find the magnificent baby Jesus made by Martínez Montañés around 1606. This sculpture would set the pattern for the most widespread representation of the Baby Jesus during the Baroque. There are innumerable representations that have taken place in the city since the 17th century and that today are spread throughout the city's churches, convents and private collections, all of them having as their starting point this masterful work by Martínez Montañés for the Tabernacle. The image parades every year in the Corpus Christi procession that leaves from the Cathedral.

- Chapel of Santa Bárbara, with a Baroque altarpiece from around 1680 presided over by the head of the chapel, flanked by Santa Teresa and Santa Elena.
In the upper part of the walls there is a good collection of baroque canvases, among which the nine made by Matías de Arteaga around 1690 stand out. The painter was a member of the Sacramental Brotherhood and the paintings represent themes from the Old Testament related in a way symbolic with the Eucharist, such as 'The parable of the wedding guests' or 'The adoration of the Mystic Lamb'.

ROYAL AUDIENCE OF SEVILLE

The Royal Court was the highest judicial institution in the city and settled in this space since the beginning of the 16th century, when it moved from its previous headquarters in the Casa de Pilatos. The current building would be built in the Renaissance style at the end of the same century by order of Felipe II.

However, the building that we can see today is far from the original, due to the numerous historical vicissitudes it has gone through.

In 1918 there was a great fire that destroyed it to a large extent and forced the transfer of the courts to Almirante Apocada street, to the place where the General Archive of Andalusia is located today.

After the fire, Aníbal González was in charge of remodeling the property, giving it its current appearance. In the 1970s it underwent another important transformation with the aim of making it the headquarters of the old Caja de San Fernando. Today it houses the headquarters of the CajaSol Foundation.